My Favorite Islam Inspired Books For Women

These books have touched my soul in a spectaular way. They’ve seen me, they’ve made me a better human, mother, wife, daughter, citizen. I whole-heartedly recommend them.

40 Rules Of Love by Elif Shafak 

“The Forty Rules of Love unfolds two tantalizing parallel narratives—one contemporary and the other set in the thirteenth century, when Rumi encountered his spiritual mentor, the whirling dervish known as Shams of Tabriz—that together explore the enduring power of Rumi’s work. “

This is one of my favorite books. I believe some books come to you at the right time in your life, this book came to me exactly when I needed it most. It truly changed my life. But this isn’t a self-help book, it’s two parallel journeys, worlds apart. Before this book, I knew Rumi the poet, but after reading this book, I met Rumi, the young scholar finding his path to Allah (s.w.t). It’s available in paperback and on Audible.

If the Oceans Were Ink by Carla Power

“If the Oceans Were Ink is Carla Power’s eye-opening story of how she and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities. Their friendship-between a secular American and a madrasa-trained sheikh-had always seemed unlikely, but now they were frustrated and bewildered by the battles being fought in their names. Both knew that a close look at the Quran would reveal a faith that preached peace and not mass murder; respect for women and not oppression. And so they embarked on a yearlong journey through the controversial text.”

Secrets of Divine Love: A Spiritual Journey into the Heart of Islam by A. Helwa

“The #1 international bestselling book, Secrets of Divine Love was written for the longing heart, for the one who is searching for something they have not been able to find. For the one who sometimes spirals into hopelessness and cannot help but feel too imperfect for a perfect God to love. This book is for the one who is at the edge of their faith, who has experienced religion as a harsh winter instead of the life-bearing spring it was sent to be by God.”

If you are interested in a guilty pleasure, Islamic-based fantasy book, I recommend City of Brass by S. A Chakraborty (which is the first of a trilogy).

“On the streets of eighteenth-century Cairo, Nahri is a con woman of unsurpassed skill. She makes her living swindling Ottoman nobles, hoping to one day earn enough to change her fortunes. But when Nahri accidentally summons Dara, an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior, during one of her cons, she learns that even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.”

This book is not for the faint of heart, there are battles of good vs. evil. But I will be honest, I read all three books in 1 month.

I know the title of this article is “Islam Inspired Books For Women” but I’ve also gifted these books to men, who said they enjoyed them.

Peace and Salam,

Natasha