Supporting The Black Muslim American Community

Three years ago, during Black History Month, I started sharing stories of Black American Muslims, which date back to 1522. This year, I would like to share a few ways I’ve found to support the Black Muslim community.

Donate


Donate To MuslimARC’s Black Muslim Scholarship Fund
MuslimARC is a human rights education organization that provides racial justice education and resources to advance racial equality and justice. MuslimARC shared, “help [us] invest in Black Muslim futures by investing in Black Muslim emerging anti-racism leaders. Your support will help us fund scholarships for Black Muslim anti-Racism leaders in our American Muslim Anti-Racism Leadership (AMAL) program.”

Donate to The Muslims Wellness Foundation
During Black History Months, MWF launched a fundraiser for their Deeply Rooted Project. MWF shared this: “Deeply Rooted Project is a Black Muslim mental health initiative which explores the unique vulnerabilities of being Black and Muslim in the United States and seeks to enhance protective factors which mitigates stressors and promote positive psychological well-being. This initiative includes the annual Black Muslim Psychology Conference, the Deeply Rooted Emerging Leaders (DREL) fellowship and Aya Circle – A reflection and process group for women.” You can donate directly to MWF or purchase a veryBlack, veryMuslim apparel from their new bonfire store.

Read Books From Black Muslim American Authors

“The ink of the scholar is holier than the blood of the martyr” a famous quote from Prophet Mohammad (s.w.a.) highlights the importance of writing and exchange of stories and ideas.

Author Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow wrote a powerful essay for We Need Diverse Books titled, “The Disappearance of the Black Muslim Author“. She states, “Intersectional authors need the support of people who believe great stories deserve wide audiences even when those wide audiences don’t yet understand the identities of these authors and their characters. Bigotry and the various ways the world can be racist cannot be the barometer for what stories should be told. ” Have you read a book written by a Black Muslim author, recently, or ever? This is your moment. Check out this Black Muslim Authors on Good Reads.

A nonfiction picture book that I love: Malcolm Little: The Boy Who Grew Up To Be Malcolm X.

Photo Credit: diversebooks.org

Normalize Black Muslim Leaders

Every Black History Month, I add a new Black Muslim History coloring sheet to my book. This year I created a page for Congresswoman Ilhan Abdullahi Omar. She is the first Somali American, the first naturalized citizen of African birth, the first woman of color to present Minnesota in the United States Congress. She is also one of the first two Muslim women to serve in Congress. In 2019, former President Trump eluded that Ilhan should “go back” to the country she came from. In response, more than a hundred Minnesota supporters greeted Congresswoman Ilhan at the airport with signs that said, “Welcome home, Ilhan.” Congresswoman continues to fight for the American dream.

How To Save Coloring Sheets:

  1. Right-Click Save As on the links below.
  2. OR open these links in a new page and print from the page
  3. Print Ilhan Omar
  4. Print Iman Abdulmajid
  5. Print Mahershala Ali
  6. Print SZA
  7. Print Kareem Abdul Jabar
  8. Print Malcolm X

If you have recommendations for more ways that I can support, please share your resources and ideas.

Peace & Salam,
Natasha

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